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Tag Archive parenting

ByJayanthi

After Xth grade, what’s next(India)?

Having asked this question many times over from fellow moms, what better way to answer the questions rather than a blog post! 🙂 After doing extensive research and interviewing a lot of parents to see what would work, these are my findings 🙂 With rules and regulations changing quickly and new facilities appearing, it is good to keep researching continuously.

There are quite a few options to move forward if you are from one of the two popular boards ICSE or CBSE.

  1. ISC for 11th and 12th grade
  2. CBSE for 11th and 12th grade
  3. PU system if you are in a state that offers the same
  4. International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme (DP)
  5. Integrated programs(Allen, FIITJEE, BASE, Akaash and more)

Let us see each of them in a bit of detail:

ISC for 11th and 12th grade 

This is probably the simplest to understand. It is just a continuation of the ICSE syllabus and if you are already in the ICSE board till Xth grade, you might know how ISC for 11th and 12th will be!

If you are opting for ISC for 11th and 12th grade, it will also be better to pair it with other coaching such as FIITJEE, Allen, BASE etc to get professional help for competitive exams.

CBSE board for 11th and 12th grade:

CBSE board for 11th and 12th is also probably the easiest to understand – it is just a continuation of CBSE system. Students might initially feel a jump in 11th grade if you are moving from 10th grade CBSE, but it will all even out eventually. 

If you are opting for CBSE too, for 11th and 12th grade, it will also be better to pair it with other coaching such as FIITJEE, Allen, BASE etc 
to get professional help for competitive exams.

PU college for 11th and 12th grade:

PU(Pre-university exam) college is followed in Karnataka and I am sure in many other states. I do not have much experience with PU colleges and have not done much homework either 🙂 so, I would suggest you to look up appropriate PU colleges in your area and see if they offer integrated PU programs or independant PU programs and what will be best for you.

future

International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme (DP)

The IB program is offered in many schools in Bangalore and is much more expensive than other programs. The study method might also be vastly different from the Indian education system. The IB program is mostly for children who want to pursue their undergraduate education abroad. (Note: It is not that kids who have not studied in the IB program cannot do well in undergraduate program abroad – the IB program just gives a head start) On the other hand, kids who do join the IB program “might” find it difficult to get admission through the normal college streams for India.

So, in this regard, if the child is planning to go abroad for undergraduate admission and if you do not need to dig deep into your pockets for funding – go for the IB program – otherwise, if your child is planning to study in India – my idea is to stick with the Indian boards.

Integrated programs:

Engineering and medical entrance exams and coaching were a rage when we studied and it is rage even today. 

Integrated programs offer both 11th and 12th grade classes and coaching for IIT/NEET etc. This is done by institutions such as ALLEN, FIITJEE, various PU colleges. This is expected to lessen the time for kids to shuttle between regular school/PU college and IIT/NEET coaching classes. 

These are some of the options for students to consider after completing Xth grade in India. Most of us parents have to do a lot of homework to see what works for best for us. Sometimes, we are attached to the school and sometimes to our friends circle -so,  as parents I would suggest to:

  1. Ask the child what he/she would like to do(like Physics, Chemistry, Math, Bio or any other subject) and that they are happy doing it
  2. Choose the corresponding school/college liked by both parents and the child
  3. Check whether the child want to study in India/abroad
  4. See if it fits our budget! 🙂
  5. And lastly make sure it is legal

Hope these tips help you make the decision for you and your child!

ByJayanthi

Are you a ‘helicopter’ parent? :)

I am sure most of us are guilty of this in today’s world. And rightly so…I know, I  definitely am!! 🙂 Even as there different parenting styles and unique children, there are some parenting feelings that come by intuition. One of that may be “helicopter parenting”!! 🙂 

What is ‘helicopter parenting’?

We see so many atrocities committed all around us and more heinous crimes against children. This automatically makes us more protective of our children. We shield them more and more and we “hover” over every move of theirs which leads us to the term “helicopter parenting”. So, “helicopter” parenting is hovering over the kids too much and monitoring their activities and lives most of the time. This over protection is so much that sometimes they are not able to take many decisions on their own.

The problem partly arises, because they may grow but in our eyes, they are still the same “small child”! 🙂 and we worry wherever they go.  We may never have been brought up that way but in today’s world, “worry” comes with parenting. We cannot allow them to freely walk outside, cannot allow them to cross the road on their own(even if they are 15 years old!! :)), cannot allow them to travel by city buses, cannot allow them to do any house work and on and on. We smother them and shield and it sometimes continues all through their lives!! Parents remain as parents – “the all knowing ones!! :))” and children remain “children” – the “all unknowing ones”!! 🙂 (This continues even if you are 30 year old child and 60 year old parent!! ;))

Is it wrong?

I am sure there is no perfect right or prefect wrong in parenting. What might work for one might not work for another. However, I don’t think there is anything wrong with “helicopter parenting” at a young age when the child does not know right from wrong. But after they grow, too much of hovering might impede a child’s ability to be independent(all said and done, after a while they will be independent – just the path will be harder)

How do we solve this?

As I ponder “unhelicoptering” I have started to let them take decisions on their own and encouraging them to be free outside(at least one of my kids is eligible for that) It is a fine line to teach them to be independent as well not neglect them entirely either. I am still learning the ropes of dealing with “unhelicoptering”… Wish me luck!!  🙂